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Media sources for June 2014 primary election

Apr 14, 2014

The following faculty of University of the Pacific and Pacific McGeorge School of Law are available to speak on various aspects of the upcoming statewide direct primary election, from voter IDs to the initiative process to electronic voting.

U.S political process, campaigns, elections
Keith Smith, assistant professor of political science at University of the Pacific, is frequently quoted by print and electronic media on the U.S. political process, campaigns and elections, and the U.S. government. He has written a paper on the 2010 Proposition 14, which fundamentally changed primary elections from selecting party nominees to determine candidates. He is available to speak on these and other topics surrounding the election. Contact: ksmith4@pacific.edu, 209.946.7712

Ambition in American politics, legal philosophy
Jeffrey Becker, associate professor of political science at University of the Pacific, is the author of "Ambition in America: Political Power and the Collapse of Citizenship." He has been quoted and interviewed on radio about what it takes to succeed in American politics and how voters feel about it. He is available to speak on these and other topics leading up to the November election. Contact:

California's initiative process, election process, state constitution
Mary-Beth Moylan, a professor at Pacific's McGeorge School of Law, is an expert on California's initiative process, election process and constitution. She lectures and writes on these topics, while also serving as director of the Global Lawyering Skills program. Before entering academia, she clerked for a federal judge and worked in a large law firm as a civil litigator and in one of the few firms that specializes in political law. Contact: mmoylan@pacific.edu, 916.739.7223

Election laws, civil rights, constitutional law
University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law Professor Brian K. Landsberg served as associate counsel for the U.S. Department of Justice in Selma, Ala., civil rights cases in 1964, and currently writes and lectures extensively on civil rights and constitutional law. He is the author of the books "Enforcing Civil Rights: Race Discrimination and the Department of Justice" and "Free at Last to Vote: The Alabama Origins of the 1965 Voting Rights Act." He worked for 22 years the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division. Contact: Contact: Contact: Brian K. Landsberg, 916.739.7103, blandsberg@pacific.edu

Media contact:
Keith Michaud | 209.946.3275 (Office) | 209.470.3206 (Cell) | kmichaud@pacific.edu